Bike wheels

pontrumlee
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Bike wheels

Postby pontrumlee » Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:03 am

Hello team
I am thinking of buying new wheels for my Merida ride 91 I way 100kg and ride about 200 k per week...my question is how much advantage would there be in me swapping my Alex 24 rims for something a bit lighter..any help would be appreciated

Neddysmith
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby Neddysmith » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:05 am

Id imagine itll feel much nicer to ride and probably roll better as well, a set of wheels is one the biggest upgrades i believe you can do to a bike.

Paddles
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby Paddles » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:09 am

Unless your current rims are worn/unsafe, I'd just hang onto the cash.

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Ivanerrol
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby Ivanerrol » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:33 am

I weigh 100 kilos.
After the last visit to the LBS to get some wheels trued, I was advised to get off those 622.14 wheels with 24mm tyres and onto wider wheels and tyres.
The subject of lighter wheels came up. The advise was to stick with 32 spoke wheels with a minimum inside width of 17mm and 28mm tyres.
My body weight vs minor wheel weight reduction was subjective.
Alex Rims being generally the bottom of the rung wheels installed on new bikes to keep the costs down.
I'd be more concerned with these less expensive wheels going out of true more often.

Not necessarily lighter wheels but better quality, sturdier wheels.

When I retook up cycling I weighed 115 kilos. I managed to get down to 95 kilos in six months. A layoff for a few months meant the weight crept up to 102 kilos. I'm now back to 100 and going down slowly. My hill climbing ability is directly proportional to each kilo I take off.
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find_bruce
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby find_bruce » Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:50 am

As per Ivanerrol, any weight you save on wheels will be infinitesimal compared to the weight you (& I for that matter) can reduce off the rider.

Sure if you want to buy bling then whatever makes you happy, just don't fool yourself that there will be a significant performance gain

Deus_Ex_Machina
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby Deus_Ex_Machina » Fri Dec 07, 2018 11:14 pm

I'm a cycling noob but work as a personal trainer amongst other things and I gotta agree with find_bruce. Managing weight is a real struggle for some and I understand that but I'm always a bit baffled by saving a few hundred grams on kit (unless you are at the elite end) unless you are lean as buggery. I'm 178cm and 74kg and relatively lean but you know what I could probably still find a keg or two on the front of the torso if I really tried. That's an entire wheel.

madmacca
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby madmacca » Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:29 pm

I agree with Ivanerrol - at that weight, you want something reasonably robust and that will allow you to run wider tyres (and therefore lower pressures). Tyres make a much bigger difference than wheels. Wheels come into it because wider internal width is required for wider tyres.
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html#width

Many of the lighter wheels have a weight limit of 85-90 kg. Unless the width is limited, I'd save your cash at the moment.

NASHIE
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby NASHIE » Sat Dec 08, 2018 6:10 pm

If she has done a few k's then a good servcie new cassette/chain and tyres and she will feel like a new bike. Better bang for your buck than new wheels :wink:

paule11
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby paule11 » Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:22 pm

Get Campagnolo Zondas stiff strong light and fast

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biker jk
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby biker jk » Sat Dec 08, 2018 8:59 pm

paule11 wrote:Get Campagnolo Zondas stiff strong light and fast


The op is close to the weight limit for Campagnolo wheels of 109kg so not a great suggestion. 16 spokes on the front and 21 on the rear for a 100kg rider is asking for trouble. Just curious to know what makes those wheels fast?

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rodneycc
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby rodneycc » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:27 am

biker jk wrote:
paule11 wrote:Get Campagnolo Zondas stiff strong light and fast


The op is close to the weight limit for Campagnolo wheels of 109kg so not a great suggestion. 16 spokes on the front and 21 on the rear for a 100kg rider is asking for trouble. Just curious to know what makes those wheels fast?


Zondas are great. I hover between 100kg and 105kg and I've had Zondas for years (the 2013 old 15mm wide so even narrower than the current ones). 109kg weight limit I would say is fairly generous guide with a bit of leadway like most of the Campy/Fulcrum range which are just brilliant (and Ive tried most).

I bought my Zondas secondhand, did a few thousand kms and have sold them onto a work collegue who loves them as well replacing his stock wheels on a Trek Domane ( which he buckled one on a crash). I advised him not to run 28mm tyres on them (being 15mm) at the time but he did anyway and said they run great without a problem on his commutes. The current Zondas would be great with 28mm tyres and ideal for fast tarmac commutes.

Maybe 120kgs I'd be worried (so 100kg plus a lot of packing). But at 100kg like me with min packing then not a problem. Not many people would take an airline suitcase worth of weight with them on the bike!

https://intheknowcycling.com/2017/04/25 ... -squirrel/
Last edited by rodneycc on Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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rodneycc
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby rodneycc » Sun Dec 09, 2018 9:41 am

Btw Reid cycles used to have an "upgrade" option on there Falco bikes from Alex rims (may have even been Alex 24) to Mavic Aksiums which were solid but unspectacular wheels.

Now Zondas are much much better than the Aksiums.

I do agree with the others about losing body weight and fitness being the best bet but at the same time think a modest wheel upgrade is well worth it as well ( I am a sucker for the rotational weight theory of good wheels opposed to carbon bidon cages for instance or a few grams off the weight of a saddle).
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foo on patrol
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby foo on patrol » Sun Dec 09, 2018 12:21 pm

I find it strange the comment about 100-110kg riders not being able to ride low spoke count wheels, as I've ridden on them for ages and even on the Track, I race with a 16sp front and I'm 108-110kgs. :? Perhaps you should say.........cheap low spoke count wheels? :wink:

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biker jk
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby biker jk » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:03 pm

rodneycc wrote:
biker jk wrote:
paule11 wrote:Get Campagnolo Zondas stiff strong light and fast


The op is close to the weight limit for Campagnolo wheels of 109kg so not a great suggestion. 16 spokes on the front and 21 on the rear for a 100kg rider is asking for trouble. Just curious to know what makes those wheels fast?


Zondas are great. I hover between 100kg and 105kg and I've had Zondas for years (the 2013 old 15mm wide so even narrower than the current ones). 109kg weight limit I would say is fairly generous guide with a bit of leadway like most of the Campy/Fulcrum range which are just brilliant (and Ive tried most).

I bought my Zondas secondhand, did a few thousand kms and have sold them onto a work collegue who loves them as well replacing his stock wheels on a Trek Domane ( which he buckled one on a crash). I advised him not to run 28mm tyres on them (being 15mm) at the time but he did anyway and said they run great without a problem on his commutes. The current Zondas would be great with 28mm tyres and ideal for fast tarmac commutes.

Maybe 120kgs I'd be worried (so 100kg plus a lot of packing). But at 100kg like me with min packing then not a problem. Not many people would take an airline suitcase worth of weight with them on the bike!

https://intheknowcycling.com/2017/04/25 ... -squirrel/


Your opinion is well and good but here's what Campagnolo states:

All Campagnolo wheels are constructed to meet the highest standards of resistance and durability. If you weigh over 109 kg/240 lbs we advise you not to use this product. Non compliance with this warning can damage the product irreversibly. If you weigh 82 kg/180 lbs or more, you must be especially vigilant and have your bicycle inspected more frequently (than someone weighing less than 82 kg/180 lbs). Check with your mechanic to discuss whether the wheels you selected are suitable for your use, and to determine the frequency of inspections. Using tires with a larger diameter and a frame that respects the standards will help to increase the lifetime of the wheels.

The suggestion that even riders weighing 82kg or more need to be careful suggestions that there isn't much leeway around 109kg.

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biker jk
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby biker jk » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:09 pm

foo on patrol wrote:I find it strange the comment about 100-110kg riders not being able to ride low spoke count wheels, as I've ridden on them for ages and even on the Track, I race with a 16sp front and I'm 108-110kgs. :? Perhaps you should say.........cheap low spoke count wheels? :wink:

Foo


You can ride them but the facts are that spoke breakages are more likely at that rider weight with low spoke count wheels. I can mention anecdotal experience as well. My wife hit a half brick with a 32 spoke wheel I built. Result was a front and rear pinch flat but the wheel wasn't even out of true. But when she hit a pot hole with a Shimano C24 (16 spokes front, 20 spokes rear) the wheelset was cactus.

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foo on patrol
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby foo on patrol » Sun Dec 09, 2018 1:16 pm

biker jk wrote:
foo on patrol wrote:I find it strange the comment about 100-110kg riders not being able to ride low spoke count wheels, as I've ridden on them for ages and even on the Track, I race with a 16sp front and I'm 108-110kgs. :? Perhaps you should say.........cheap low spoke count wheels? :wink:

Foo


You can ride them but the facts are that spoke breakages are more likely at that rider weight with low spoke count wheels. I can mention anecdotal experience as well. My wife hit a half brick with a 32 spoke wheel I built. Result was a front and rear pinch flat but the wheel wasn't even out of true. But when she hit a pot hole with a Shimano C24 (16 spokes front, 20 spokes rear) the wheelset was cactus.


Strange how the only wheels that I have broken spokes in, are the higher spoke count. :? I still say it has a lot to do with how you ride. :idea: That's my experience with low spoke count. :wink:

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rodneycc
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby rodneycc » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:10 pm

C24s are not equal to the same level Campy or Fulcrum. The 9000 series are actually quite fragile on large hits ( go out of true much more likely than the fulcrums Ive found (can't speak about the newer 9100). Even the older 7900 and 7800 C24s I think seemed a bit more solid.

But Foo is right about the way you treat them, at the end of the day don't gutter bash them and treat them with respect. You can be unlucky with any wheel if you hit something out of the ordinary, remember they are road wheels and not mtb wheels!

I can only relate what my experiences have been with a series of wheels. I rate the Zondas more robust than the 9000 series c24 but not as fast and rate Shamals and Racing zeros the best overall wheels for speed and robustness ( at a certain price point).

Seeing that Campy/Fulcrum have that same warning preamble on all their wheels from low budget to high performance tells me its more to satisfy their legal team. Therefore I stand by my experience.
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Neddysmith
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby Neddysmith » Mon Dec 10, 2018 9:11 am

foo on patrol wrote:Strange how the only wheels that I have broken spokes in, are the higher spoke count. :? I still say it has a lot to do with how you ride. :idea: That's my experience with low spoke count. :wink:

Foo


Yep i'd agree with this, i sit between 96-98kg, and have a few different sets of wheels i change between Campy Shamal G3, some GRP carbons and riden on a few others as well, ride both hills and fast flats and have never really had an issue with wheels going out of true or breaking spokes, so i certainly believe it comes down to how you ride, or perhaps ive just been extremely lucky.

And while yes body weight makes a difference when riding, having nice set of wheels will make a difference.

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foo on patrol
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Re: Bike wheels

Postby foo on patrol » Fri Dec 14, 2018 7:54 am

I will also state, that one set of wheels (DT SWiss) I broke a front spoke (never broken a front spoke in my life before) and the rear had one pop whilst just riding at 25kmh and on the flat. The rear was replaced and before I even got the wheel back another went, then another, then another, :shock: so I ended up having to get the rear, fully re-spoked. :evil: Turn out, that there was a bad run of spokes when these were made, so I was unlucky. :( All up, the rear wheel had one break whilst riding but another six, popped before I got it back. :shock:

Two of the rear wheels spoke where the spoke popped, was when I was kicking at the start of a sprint, again high spoke count wheels but training wheels, not my good race wheels. :wink:

Foo
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